Education

Many people are not yet familiar with the real benefits of marijuana as medicine. Some of the populace still considers it just a way to “legally get high” while medical schools rarely, if at all, teach future doctors about medical marijuana. However, scientific research in recent years has begun to demonstrate the value of marijuana as medicine. Credible groundbreaking studies show positive results in the treatment of multiple medical conditions, such as Epilepsy, Cancer, AIDS, Arthritis, pain, and more. Marygold Laboratories is committed to sharing this scientific knowledge and educating the public on these advancements.

WEEKLY ARTICLES ON FACEBOOK

Every week, Marygold Lab posts educational material on its Facebook Page. Follow us for regular updates on scientific advances and legislative changes. Want to help educate the world on medical marijuana? 

 

MaryGold Laboratories

MaryGold Laboratories is a locally owned and operated Arkansas quality control laboratory— a close-knit team of microbiologists, lab technicians, and dedicated industry members based in Little Rock. With roots in craft beer quality assurance testing and genetic research, MaryGold labs has devoted wholeheartedly to the medical marijuana industry as soon as Arkansas voted yes on Issue 6 in November of 2016. Our mission is to provide accurate, affordable, and quick regulatory testing to the Arkansas Medical Cannabis industry. With modern methodology, highly specialized equipment, and thorough understanding of the field. We at MaryGold Labs strive to help grow the Arkansas cannabis community into the nation’s most prosperous, potent, and profitable cannabis state. Arkansas is one of the first and few Southern states to legalize medical marijuana, and we believe that for this to spread strong roots in the American South, Arkansas has a staunch responsibility to maintain an unblemished record for quality and safety. Therefore, we are devoted to nurturing an atmosphere of education and continued improvement for cultivators, dispensaries, and patients alike. First and foremost however, MaryGold is a laboratory, and as such we dutifully aim to go above and beyond the simply required scope of testing, to offer our customers a wide range of services. We can test the entire range of analysis required by Department of Health, as well as various additional tests, some of which include: Terpene Analysis, Potency Quantification, Cannabinoid Profiling, Mycotoxins—Fungal Contaminant Detection, Bacterial Contamination Detection, Pesticides Panel, Heavy Metals Screening, Residual Solvent Analysis, Water Testing [Activity, Content, & Moisture].
MaryGold Laboratories
MaryGold Laboratories
Why You’re Not Actually Going to Die from Too Much Marijuana: Neuroscience

Even casual users have probably experienced an overdose of marijuana, and while it may make a person really uncomfortable and anxious, it’s not going to kill you. Why is it that, in a time when opioid overdose kills 42,000 Americans annually, and alcohol overconsumption kills an additional 2,200, marijuana is so relatively safe? The difference is found in the brain.

The brain stem is the region where your brain connects to the spine. It is here that processes crucial to life, like breathing and blood pressure regulation, are controlled. A specific section of the brain stem known as the pre-Bötzinger complex regulates respiration, and this region also happens to contain a lot of opioid receptors. So as opioids like fentanyl and Oxycontin are consumed, they can suppress breathing. Too high a dose and breathing fails altogether. Alcohol poisoning occurs when blood alcohol levels become so high that the brain stem is anesthetized and respiration and blood pressure regulation are shut down.

So, why can’t marijuana do the same thing? Well, in general, marijuana affects the body through the receptors of the endocannabinoid system. These receptors are present throughout the brain, but at very low levels in the brain stem. Therefore, it is impossible for marijuana to suppress these live-giving processes.

For more detailed information about the neurology behind opioid, alcohol and marijuana exposure, see the Leafly article in the comments
https://www.leafly.com/news/science-tech/can-you-overdose-on-cannabis
MaryGold Laboratories
MaryGold Laboratories
CBD Therapy Reduces Anxiety in Teenagers

A small scale study of Japanese teenagers suffering from social anxiety disorder (SAD) found that daily treatment with CBD oil was an effective method to reduce anxiety when compared to a placebo. 37 18-19 year old participants who were not currently undergoing pharmaceutical or behavioral therapy were given 300 mg of hemp-derived CBD oil or a placebo daily for four weeks in a double-blind trial. Their SAD was evaluated using two different professional scales at the start and end of the study. Both scales showed a significant reduction over the course of the study, while the placebo group did not. Additionally, the CBD group expressed an increase willingness to pursue traditional SAD therapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy than the placebo patients.

Anxiety is one of the most common psychological disorders and can begin as early as 5 years old, with SAD having a mean onset age of 15.7 years. Current treatments are cumbersome or have undesirable side effects, which can limit therapy participation. Previous research, particularly at the preclinical level, has suggested that cannabis may be an effective treatment for anxiety, which this study supports.

To view the manuscript, see: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02466/full

OTHER EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

CANNIBAS-MED.ORG

There is a multitude of scientific studies and case reports regarding medical marijuana. This website, run by cannabis-med.org, lists a large number of research articles, from 1974 to today. This resource can be used to learn what’s out there, with a one-sentence conclusion of the findings. However, the original articles are not accessible through the website, but may be searched for on pubmed (which only sometimes provides full copies).

NATIONAL ACADEMIES OF SCIENCES, ENGINEERING, AND MEDICINE

The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids is a 487 page book published in 2017. It is a comprehensive review of scientific information and future research needs pertaining to medical marijuana. The book briefly introduces the plant and its history, discusses US policy regarding marijuana, then focuses on the treatment of various illnesses using Cannabis.

If you desire education on how marijuana affects different medical conditions, this book is an excellent resource. The book can be purchased here.

or be downloaded as a PDF for free here.

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Who is eligible to become a medical marijuana patient?
 

A patient who has any of the qualifying conditions eligible for treatment with cannabis in the state of Arkansas, as defined by the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Commission.

– Condensed List: Cancer, Glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, ALS, Tourette’s, Crohn’s, Ulcerative Colitis, PTSD, Severe Arthritis, Fibromyalgia, Alzheimer’s, Cachexia, Peripheral Neuropathy, Intractable Pain, Seizures, Severe Nausea, and Severe Persistent Muscle Spasms.

– Please note this list is not comprehensive, and it is recommended to consult the MMC’s list [here], the Department of Health’s list [here], and with a qualified physician, to determine if cannabis treatment may be of medical value to any given patient.

What is a caregiver?
– A certified caregiver for a medical marijuana patient is somebody who is legally allowed to purchase, transport, and assist in administering medical marijuana to another registered medical cannabis patient—one who is otherwise unable to do so themselves.

– Homebound or disabled cannabis patients, for instance, will typically require a registered caregiver’s assistance.

– The application process and fees are largely the same for both patients and caregivers.

– A caregiver may also be a registered cannabis patient themselves.

– A caregiver may be registered to more than one patient, but must fill out separate applications for each patient and pay the $50 application fee separately for each application.

How do I become a medical marijuana patient?
– Consult with your physician about medical cannabis. If your physician deems it potentially beneficial to try medical cannabis treatment, you may request a physician certification for medical marijuana (note that a physician is not required to certify a patient for cannabis, even if the patient has a relevant condition). The physician’s certification is valid for 30 days from issuance, and must be filed with the Arkansas Alcoholic Beverage Control Board (ABC) with proof of Arkansas residency (AR driver’s license, or state-issued ID) to complete the registration process and receive a medical cannabis registry ID card.
How do I become a medical marijuana patient?

– Consult with your physician about medical cannabis. If your physician deems it potentially beneficial to try medical cannabis treatment, you may request a physician certification for medical marijuana (note that a physician is not required to certify a patient for cannabis, even if the patient has a relevant condition). The physician’s certification is valid for 30 days from issuance, and must be filed with the Arkansas Alcoholic Beverage Control Board (ABC) with proof of Arkansas residency (AR driver’s license, or state-issued ID) to complete the registration process and receive a medical cannabis registry ID card.

What do I need to apply for a cannabis registry ID card?

– ABC Application Form (online or paper)

– Physician Certification (signed and completed, <30 days prior)

– Valid Arkansas ID (name and address matching driver’s license)

– $50 application fee (non-refundable)

Who can prescribe medical marijuana?

– A medical provider who:

  • Is a doctor of medicine or osteopathy licensed in the state of Arkansas
  • Is in good standing to practice medicine in Arkansas
  • Has a controlled substances license on file with the DEA
  • Has a bona fide physician-patient relationship with the cannabis patient
How much cannabis can a registered patient or caregiver possess at one time?

Registered patients and caregivers are allowed to purchase and possess no more than 2.5 ounces of cannabis every 14 days.

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